July 16, 2014
"The bottom line point is that Looking for Rights is an important work by a talented young scholar that will both change how we talk about American constitutionalism and offer numerous fruitful paths for more creative thinking about the entire American constitutional experience."

Balkinization

"My best friend from summer camp 1994 is a fucking genius and don’t you forget it."

rachelfershleiser

Aww!

(via rachelfershleiser)

12:23pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZA9Xev1Lf9GFP
  
Filed under: friends 
July 11, 2014
americasgreatoutdoors:

How hot is it in Death Valley National Park? So hot that this coyote pup decided to cool off in this bird bath!Photo: National Park Service

americasgreatoutdoors:

How hot is it in Death Valley National Park? So hot that this coyote pup decided to cool off in this bird bath!

Photo: National Park Service

July 4, 2014
Wired: A Cloudless Atlas — How MapBox Aims to Make the World’s ‘Most Beautiful Map’, by Tim Maly

digitalurbanisms:

I really love Tim Maly’s account of Mapbox’s process. It shows us the power of combining computation power with human creativity in the production of perception. Even maps, are socially and mathematically constructed. Here’s a large chunk from his article, which should be read in its…

June 17, 2014

(Source: machistado, via astrodidact)

June 6, 2014
conservationbiologist:

African Wild Dog photographed with #beetlecam in Hwange, Zimbabwe

conservationbiologist:

African Wild Dog photographed with #beetlecam in Hwange, Zimbabwe

June 4, 2014

Fast & Slow

Barley, our greyhound/labrador mutt, was fascinated to encounter two Eastern Box Turtles this morning in Cylburn Arboretum.

May 29, 2014

startorialist:

I first saw these cosmic Converse a couple months ago, but I didn’t think I needed to buy them right away. I’ve had so many pairs, and they wear out so quickly.

I found myself at a mall a couple weeks ago so I thought I’d see them in person, but they were out of stock. Worried that they might be a temporary style, I ordered them online, and they arrived just yesterday.

FELLOW ASTRONISTAS, MY LIFE HAS BEEN CHANGED BY A PAIR OF SNEAKERS! Not only are they silky and slightly shiny, as opposed to the typical canvas chucks, the print is a real NASA image of the Small Magellanic Cloud! Specifically the region around NGC 602 and data from Hubble, Spitzer, and Chandra space telescopes. The young stars! The dusty filaments! The background galaxy! Everything is there, on my sneakers! I’m going to stock up on extra pairs.

Oh, and neildegrassetieson approves. Too bad they don’t come in his size! (I really buried the lede there, didn’t I?)


—Emily

May 23, 2014

Happy World Turtle Day!

Photos taken while freediving in Bonaire.

May 22, 2014
mayhewbergman:

Stop what you’re doing & cuddle your chicks. Especially if they have head-tufts.

Brings back memories of the polish chicks I tried to raise when I was a kid.

mayhewbergman:

Stop what you’re doing & cuddle your chicks. Especially if they have head-tufts.

Brings back memories of the polish chicks I tried to raise when I was a kid.

1:00pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZA9Xev1Gac-uD
  
Filed under: chickens 
May 22, 2014
npr:

Kyle Dewitt, Ionia, Mich. 
Offense: Caught a fish out of season.
Punishment: Three days in jail.
About this case: Then 19, Dewitt had just lost his job; he says he couldn’t afford the original $155 fine. The court offered him payment plans, but he says he never received the letter.
Court debt: More than $215.
A yearlong NPR investigation found that the costs of the criminal justice system in the United States are paid increasingly by the defendants and offenders. Here are just some of the people we found as part of this story. 

npr:

Kyle Dewitt, Ionia, Mich. 

  • Offense: Caught a fish out of season.
  • Punishment: Three days in jail.
  • About this case: Then 19, Dewitt had just lost his job; he says he couldn’t afford the original $155 fine. The court offered him payment plans, but he says he never received the letter.
  • Court debt: More than $215.

A yearlong NPR investigation found that the costs of the criminal justice system in the United States are paid increasingly by the defendants and offenders. Here are just some of the people we found as part of this story. 

May 17, 2014
Feet

Feet

May 13, 2014

awkwardsituationist:

photos of 22º radius halos, which occur as the light from the sun or the moon, usually when close to the horizon, pass through thin, hexagonal plate shaped ice crystals high up in cirrus clouds. also shown are parhelia (or sundogs) and paraselenae (or lunar parhelic/snowdogs, as seen in the fourth and seventh images.) the first and second photos also show the 46º halo and tangent arc, with the latter showing the parhelic circle as well, while the eighth photo shows a sun pilar. (learn more)

photos by (click pic) sean daviessebastian saarloos, sverrir thorolfssonsteve nilsennorbert rosing, cheestringer, china news, david cartier and svein nordrum

(via spaceexp)

April 30, 2014

wearethetay:

jedavu:

Charming Illustrated Cinemagraphs Reflect The Idyllic Mood Of Lazy Summer Days

by Rebecca Mock 

You can feel each one…

(via meganleestudio)

April 20, 2014
oosik:

thejunglenook:

Q: How can we quickly tell a Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus) from a Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) in the field? 

1. ColorationOther than the obvious head coloration differences (which you may / may not be able to spot when in the field) Turkey Vultures have a light underside to their flight feathers, giving them a two-toned appearance across their wings. Black Vultures have white shafts on their outer six primaries and white patches or ‘stars’, so their two-toned appearance is limited to the wing tip region.
2. Wing Shape
The Turkey Vulture has a greater dihedral angle (angle of the wings angled above horizontal) when compared to the Black Vulture’s soaring on horizontal (or slightly above horizontal) wings.  Of course, if you happen to be watching a mixed group of vultures you can also make an easy ID just by noticing the larger wingspan of the Turkey Vulture.

3. Tail Shape
Turkey Vultures have a long, rudder-like, round tail that extends well past their toes while in flight. Black Vultures have short bluntly rounded tails that hardly extend past their toes. 
4. Flying Style
Because Turkey Vultures are so light (64oz average with a 5 1/2 ft wingspan) so they can soar the thermals for extended periods of time with little to no flapping. When wing flapping is required, the wingbeats are measured and deep. (ex. Flap———— Flap ———— Flap———-) Being a (relative) lightweight isn’t all grace, these guys have a characteristic rocking motion to their soar as they get buffeted by thermal currents.Black vultures have a shorter wingspan and are heavier birds (68 oz average with a wingspan just shy of 5ft) so their wingload is higher and they rely on strong high thermals to stay aloft. They have shallow almost frantic wing beats in three to five rapid clusters. (Flap-Flap-Flap———- Flap-Flap-Flap-Flap———)

Bonus points go out to hyaenabee, ktsaurusr3x, primestigma, nomchimpsky for their excellent answers.Pun points to arrowsforpens because I really wish it was simply a difference of a pinion.
Read more about vultures here, here, here, and here! 

And here’s a turkey vulture with all its soft tissue removed. These don’t fly very well but you can see the “tubercles” on the ulna. These defined bumps are where the bird’s large primary feathers attach. 


Bonus photo: Here’s a comparison of a turkey vulture ulna with that of a velociraptor, each showing evidence of the same anatomical feature.

Picture credit: Mick Ellison
Image above caption:
(A) View of right ulna of Velociraptor  (fossil reference: IGM 100/981).(B) Detail from cast of red box in (A), with arrows showing six evenly spaced feather quill knobs.(C) View of right ulna of a turkey vulture (Cathartes).(D) Same view of Cathartes as in (C) but with soft tissue dissected to reveal placement of the secondary feathers relative to the quill knobs.(E) Detail of Cathartes, with one quill completely removed to reveal quill knob.(F) Same view as in (E) but with quill moved to the left to show placement of quill, knob, and follicular ligament. Follicular ligament indicated with arrow.

oosik:

thejunglenook:

Q: How can we quickly tell a Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus) from a Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) in the field? 

1. Coloration

Other than the obvious head coloration differences (which you may / may not be able to spot when in the field) Turkey Vultures have a light underside to their flight feathers, giving them a two-toned appearance across their wings. Black Vultures have white shafts on their outer six primaries and white patches or ‘stars’, so their two-toned appearance is limited to the wing tip region.

2. Wing Shape

The Turkey Vulture has a greater dihedral angle (angle of the wings angled above horizontal) when compared to the Black Vulture’s soaring on horizontal (or slightly above horizontal) wings.  Of course, if you happen to be watching a mixed group of vultures you can also make an easy ID just by noticing the larger wingspan of the Turkey Vulture.

3. Tail Shape

Turkey Vultures have a long, rudder-like, round tail that extends well past their toes while in flight. Black Vultures have short bluntly rounded tails that hardly extend past their toes. 

4. Flying Style

Because Turkey Vultures are so light (64oz average with a 5 1/2 ft wingspan) so they can soar the thermals for extended periods of time with little to no flapping. When wing flapping is required, the wingbeats are measured and deep. (ex. Flap———— Flap ———— Flap———-) Being a (relative) lightweight isn’t all grace, these guys have a characteristic rocking motion to their soar as they get buffeted by thermal currents.

Black vultures have a shorter wingspan and are heavier birds (68 oz average with a wingspan just shy of 5ft) so their wingload is higher and they rely on strong high thermals to stay aloft. They have shallow almost frantic wing beats in three to five rapid clusters. (Flap-Flap-Flap———- Flap-Flap-Flap-Flap———)

Bonus points go out to hyaenabee, ktsaurusr3x, primestigma, nomchimpsky for their excellent answers.

Pun points to arrowsforpens because I really wish it was simply a difference of a pinion.

Read more about vultures here, herehere, and here

And here’s a turkey vulture with all its soft tissue removed. These don’t fly very well but you can see the “tubercles” on the ulna. These defined bumps are where the bird’s large primary feathers attach. 

image

image

Bonus photo: Here’s a comparison of a turkey vulture ulna with that of a velociraptor, each showing evidence of the same anatomical feature.

image

Picture credit: Mick Ellison

Image above caption:

(A) View of right ulna of Velociraptor  (fossil reference: IGM 100/981).
(B) Detail from cast of red box in (A), with arrows showing six evenly spaced feather quill knobs.
(C) View of right ulna of a turkey vulture (Cathartes).
(D) Same view of Cathartes as in (C) but with soft tissue dissected to reveal placement of the secondary feathers relative to the quill knobs.
(E) Detail of Cathartes, with one quill completely removed to reveal quill knob.
(F) Same view as in (E) but with quill moved to the left to show placement of quill, knob, and follicular ligament. Follicular ligament indicated with arrow.

April 18, 2014

awkwardsituationist:

cloud iridescence — caused as light diffracts through tiny ice crystals or water droplets of uniform size, usually in lenticular clouds — photographed by rolf kohl. (more cloud pics)

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